November 17 2016 | 0 Comments | 135 reads Average Rating: 3

CDC Finds Patients Non-Compliant with Meds, Analytics Could Help

by Rena Bielinski in Health Analytics

On September 16, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a report showing that about half of all Medicare beneficiaries who suffer from high blood pressure were not taking their prescribed medications. As a result, these people are at risk for heart disease, stroke, kidney disease – and, yes, death.

"While the Medicare prescription drug program has increased the affordability and accessibility of prescription drugs, more can be done to encourage Medicare beneficiaries to take their medications as directed," Sean Cavanaugh, deputy administrator and director of the Center for Medicare at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said in a press release.1

According to the CDC, provider organizations can take a variety of actions to encourage compliance such as:

  • Simplify blood pressure treatment and prescribe generic medicines.
  • Involve the entire healthcare team at several points of care to ensure patients are taking medicine as directed and to address patient concerns about side effects.
  • Encourage the use of home blood pressure monitors and easy-to-use tools (e.g. blood pressure logs and mobile apps) to track and share blood pressure readings.
  • Address financial barriers.2

Analytics might just be what’s needed to make providers’ efforts even more successful though. In fact, a study published in the American Journal of Managed Care earlier this year, suggested that pharmacy claims data may be particularly helpful with the widespread problem of medication non-adherence. By pairing aggregated pharmacy records with EHR data on newly diagnosed hypertension patients, researchers were able to identify primary non-adherence rates, as well as flag those patients more likely to deviate from their treatment regimens.3

That’s just one example, though. The continued use of analytics could help to:

  • Understand what motivates patients to comply with medication regimens and what barriers need to be removed.
  • Identify exactly which populations and patients are worth targeting with compliance programs – and which are not worth the effort.
  • Fine-tune compliance efforts (i.e. switching to a drug delivery service when data reveals that certain patient personas are not compliant because they do not have access to transportation to pick up their prescriptions).

Can you think of any other ways that data analytics can be used to help encourage medication compliance?

References

1. CDC Press Release. Poor blood-pressure control puts 5 million older Americans at risk, September 13, 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p0913-blood-pressure.html

2. Centers for Disease Control. Blood Pressure. http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/blood-pressure/

3. Comer, D., Couto, J., Aguiar, R., Wu, P., Elliott, D. Using Aggregated Pharmacy Claims to Identify Primary Nonadherence. American Journal of Managed Care, January 4, 2016. http://www.ajmc.com/journals/issue/2015/2015-vol21-n12/using-aggregated-pharmacy-claims-to-identify-primary-nonadherence/P-2

Rate this Article:

Rating: 
Average: 3 (2 votes)

Author
Rena Bielinski
SVP, Strategic Accounts

Dr. Bielinski has been with SCIO® for 11 years. She currently serves as a Strategic Account Manager for SCIO’s PBM clients as well as various health plan clients.

Read full profile and other posts |

Log in to post comments

SEARCH BLOG

OUR THOUGHT LEADERS

Arun Rangamani
SVP, Care Optimization and SCIOXpert Services


Ben Steverman
Chief Technology Officer


Bob Abrahamson
Vice President, Product Management


David Hom
Chief Evangelist


Dr. Kevin Keck
Chief Medical Officer


Jen Cressman
Vice President, Professional Services


John Pagliuca
Vice President, Life Sciences


Jonathan Niloff, MD (Guest Author)
President, Niloff Healthcare Strategies, LLC


Lalithya Yerramilli
Vice President, Analytics


Lesli Adams, MPA (Guest Author)
Director of Population Health Strategy, Oracle Corporation


Leslie Strader
Project Manager


Linda Pantovic (Guest Author)
Director of Compliance & Risk Adjustment, Scripps Health Plan Services


Mark Feeney
Life Sciences Consultant


Monique Pierce
Vice President, Business Optimization


Nayfe Faillace
Chief Compliance & Privacy Officer


Nicole Cormier
Senior Manager, Home Health


Priyanka Rajkumar
VP - SCIOXpert and Solutions, Analytics


Rachel Hall
Senior Business Analyst


Rena Bielinski
SVP, Strategic Accounts


Rodger Smith
SVP, Payment Integrity


Rose Higgins
President, North America


Subha Vaidyanathan
VP, Technology and Data Management


Taryn Bevilacqua
Compliance Director


Tom Peterson
SVP, Risk Adjustment


ARCHIVES

Sign up to receive the latest SCIO news & insights, industry updates, event updates and more, right in your inbox.